Queenstown – New Zealand's Adventure Capital

Sunset Across The Lake Against The Mountains

Driving into Queenstown we can feel our blood pressures rising.   Maybe it’s the advertisements for all of the activities?  Or perhaps it is the incredible energy of the natural beauty of the area permeating through to our souls, somehow resonating a wakeup call deep within, down where the kid in us lives?  One may never know but there is something special about New Zealand, and Queenstown in particular.  Summertime fills the streets with all ages.  The ambiance of the town is that of a mountain village.  Quaint, yet has all of the modern day conveniences you could want, including an organic food store.  Not only do they have extra long days, oftentimes adventure seeking tourists will be found frolicking between the amazing glacier fed river and the rugged, mountainous peaks.  It is there that we see the occasional dingy, the odd parachute, sometimes occupied, sometimes not.  Almost always there was someone talking about doing something “on the edge”, as it should be.  NZ is known for it’s extreme sports.  Queenstown is an amazing place to get the thrill of your life and come out virtually unscathed if you follow every safety precaution, and to take your chances with Lady Luck if you don’t.

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Welcome to the land of extreme… EVERYTHING!  Bungy jumping was invented here, among otherterrifying things you can do with and to our bodies.   The bungy bridge, from which you would throw yourself, crosses a raging ice cold river, with steep, completely unforgiving cliffs on either side setting the stage for the full-on adrenaline rush!  The amount of adrenaline junkies that come to Queenstown is staggering, and they come year round.  Why?  Oh, because the other activities may include, but are certainly not limited to: jet boating, sky diving, heli-skiing, swinging, paragliding, white water rafting and canyoning, all of which is world class.

Queenstown was born out of New Zealand’s Gold Rush.   It has relatively easy access to the river, lake and most of the region.  Driving from Dunedin is quite quick but there are many stops you can take if you so choose.  We even went panning for gold at an old gold rush operation.  Yes, it’s a tourist trap, but a fun and educational one.  Tourism took over later here than in the US, so the charm of Queenstown has been carefully scripted as you will see when you take a quick tour of the little town.  There are a few old buildings which are in use as public spaces and restaurants, but the Queenstown you see today is mostly new.  A plethora of shoppes and restaurants await, not to mention excellent day spas and alternative health care for your ailing body.  Be sure to book ahead and make your appointments for body repair immediately after you’ve gone out and done your worst to it.

Certainly one of the main attractions to Queenstown is the fact that it has a dual dichotomy.  It has both the extreme and the serene.  It was a lovely walk along the crystal blue lake just made us wish we were better painters and photographers so that we could do nature justice.  Hot summer days repeatedly turned our minds to the turquoise waters of the lake.  The mercury rising made those shimmering waters look oh so inviting, until we thoughtfully reminded ourselves that it’s colder, much, much colder than we could ever want it to be.  So, if you are adventurous, impervious to cold, (AKA: are a superhero), or are willing to don a drysuit, surely there is a fun time to be had by all!

Dusk approached and seemingly, out of nowhere, a handful of street performers dotted the pier area while the sun did it’s final dance of the day on the water.  A fiery blur of gold giving way to wavy swirls of magenta, indigo and ending on the edges with the darkness of night creeping in brought a perfect ending to a lovely day.  It was so relaxing and the weather was perfect.  Spending a summer holiday in Queenstown is superb on every level.  It’s one of those places that you might daydream about and find yourself saying quietly, “I could live here… or maybe at least have a little hideaway”.

Queenstown is perfectly situated as a stop over point when on your way to a Doubtful sound cruise.  We booked a Christmas Eve Cruise Special and decided to try the smaller, family-owned Deep Cove Charters.  It turned out to be an excellent choice and one of the most amazing experiences we have had in NZ.   Summer in Queenstown is warm, chilly and everything in between, so pack accordingly.  If you plan on being outside for any duration, get the Tui Balm and slathe it on all exposed areas.  The sand flies love and live off of the tourists.  They might be small, but they’re mighty… mighty painful!  The locals say that after a few years they don’t get bothered by them anymore but if you’re not bug resistant, get the balm.  Sand flies are a formidable force to reckon with on a hike, camping trip or just getting out of the car at certain times of the day.

Overall, summer is beautiful here, don’t forget the musthave’s are a hat, sunglasses, sunscreen, bug repellent, to bring clothes with long sleeves and pants, good hiking boots, an extra jacket and your sense of adventure.  I can’t imagine anywhere else being more exciting than Queenstown.  Luckily, it’s my job to keep looking!  Having hardly begun our drive back to Christchurch, our conversation had turned almost immediately to our next visit to the Queenstown area during the winter to do a more in depth review it’s fine accomodations, excellent restaurants, the Remarkables and other attractions.

Greenland

This is as close to Greenland that we will probably come for many years.   Maybe in the summer it would be cool to check it out the icebergs and glacier.  Greenland’s coast looked great with it’s many valleys, bays and villages.  We passed over the southern most edge of Greenland on our way to Canada.  Our flight into Europe from Canada was apparently on this same course.  I guess we flew over when I saw the amazing green auras.  The northern lights were moving rapidly around the sky in shades of green from as far as I could see.  I suspect those lights are why this place was named so.

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Sudbury, Nickel Capital Of The World

Sudbury Bush Planes
Sudbury Bush Planes
Planes Taking off from Lake Ramsey in Sudbury

Sudbury is the gateway to the North. It is located about 400 km north on highway 400 which eventually becomes Highway 69. Stopping in Barrie for dinner is a standard ritual as most people like to get out of Toronto as soon as possible to avoid traffic rush. As you drive into Sudbury I notice that it has definitely gotten greener since the last time we were here. There has been a massive re-greening process that has been going on for the past couple decades spearheaded by the mining industry that destroyed the land in the first place.

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This city was known for it’s moon like landscape as it was devoid of trees and most top soil. The city of Sudbury is located on the rim of a large crater that was created a couple hundred million years ago. The meteor impact brought a lot of minerals near to the surface in large quantities, especially nickel. There are probably a hundred mines in the area operated by either Falconbridge, now called Xtrata or Inco, now Vale Inco (lots has changed in 3 years since my last visit). During the process of refining the ore to extract the minerals a fuel was needed in the burning process. Trees were dumped into these long trenches and the ore trains would drive up to the edges and dump the ore from the mines on top. The wood was then burnt and the sulfur exhaust was given off crept along the surface killing everything in it’s path. Over the years the process has been improved and refined.

In 1970 the Super Stack was built to help push that noxious gas up into the jet stream. This helped reduce the air pollution in the city and pushed it further away. This change contributed to many things including acid rain that has killed many lakes hundreds or thousands of kilometers away. You can see it’s devastating effects in Killarney Provincial Park which is about 80 km south. You can see the Super Stack from about 40 km outside the city as it’s about 1500 feet tall. Mining has been a major part of the city for the last 125 years. It will be for many years to come as the prices and demand for minerals continue to increase worldwide.

The city also boasts things besides it’s mining achievements. There are lakes everywhere that are wonderful for swimming, boating or fishing. Bell Park is one of my favourite (getting my Canadian spelling on) swimming beach with a great place to jump into the water or to have a picnic under the trees. Our first time there this trip there was a thunderstorm as we started down to the water. Our swimming time was cut short as lightning hit the top of St. Joseph’s Healthcare Center which is located just next to the park (many of us were born in that hospital). The hospital of my birth will soon be closed as a new hospital is being built just down the road. I am proud to say that the patriarch of the family has contributed to the construction of many of the buildings in the city including Laurentation hospital, Science North, Laurentien University, Cambrian College and numerous mining industrial complexes. We would meet him often at this park during the summer months for lunch and sometime tour these buildings during construction or renovations.

The surrounding countryside is great for mountain biking, hiking, picking blueberries and building forts in the summer. In the winter it’s great for cross country skiing, snowmobiling, sliding and with all the lakes ice fishing too. You always run the risk of running into wild animals and sometimes they stroll right into the yard.

Sudbury is on the south rim of a large valley. The valley is a huge flat plain with great farming and many rivers. The Vermillion River is one that snakes through the center of the valley and is one that we know very well. We have canoed almost the entire river on many occasions over the past 30 years. Another beautiful river is the Onaping River which flows into the Vermillion. The Onaping Falls has been painted in many seasons but some very famous Canadian artists but I can’t remember who at the moment. All around the valley is great places to camp, fish and enjoy the outdoors. We didn’t have a lot of chances to do that since it thunder stormed every couple days.

Taormina, A Legendary Town

Taormina has been in existence for over 2500 years. It sits high up on the hills above the salty Iaoian Sea with a ancient Saracen Citadel above it.   The citadel is not in good condition but The Greek Theatre is.  It was started by the Greeks and expanded by the Romans over the next 5 centuries.  It’s incredible location overlooking the ancient port of Nexos makes a beautiful stage backdrop.

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Our journey into Taormina took us past Mount Etna, a 10,000′ + active volcano’s with lava flows we can see from the road.  We drove 1/2 hour through a couple long tunnels to get to the beach house.   We stayed in a beautiful 4 story beach house overlooking one of the prettiest bays in the area.  The water was definitely salty but very warm.  It was a great place to swim and the girl loved to play in it.  The beaches were not sandy like we are used to but a rocky beach which was a nice change. We wandered up into the city and enjoyed the walk through town.  The view from there was spectacular.   There we saw one of the narrowest streets in Italy. You shoulders brushes the walls as you walk.   We spent many hours sitting on the porch, enjoying the view. While in Toarmina for those few short days we visited a few restaurants and bars.  The one restaurant just down the street was wonderful.  We had a great time and the food was excellent.  We also checked out a bar in a little village about Taormina.  It was a 4 story bar with an amazing view of the lava flows and Catania.  The bar was nice and has occupied the place for over 150 years.  The decor of the place caught me a bit off guard and we thought it was funny. After visiting that place we decided to take a drive up the mountain.  It was very dark and cold, so we didn’t even feel like getting out of the car.  We couldn’t see anything and we didn’t have a light to help guide us up to the lookout.  We headed back down the mountain and home to relax in the warmth by the sea.

Agrigento – Greek Temple in The Valley of Temples

One Sunday afternoon from our base in Caltagirone we set out to Agrigento and it’s famed Valley of the Temples.  The weather was hot but it was overcast which was nice.  We strolled around this hilltop in a valley that was covered with ancient Greek temples and other ruins.

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We wandered through them marveling at how well they were preserved. It is said that the Tempio Della Concordia is one of the best preserved Greek temple in the world.   In total there are over 20 ruins that run the length of the hill.  We explored and touched the stones and pillars of Tempo Di Ercole.  The dimensions were impressive and with a prominent spot on the ridge had a beautiful view towards the sea.

These temples had a spectacular setting.  Aligned East West on a cliff looking out to sea.  Over the years they have been converted to Mosques and Churches depending on who was in power.  Some were toppled by earthquakes over the centuries and the stone was used in new buildings.

They now are closely protected, like other ruins in Italy, structural  enhancements have been made to reduce further degradation and collapse.

We left after the moon started to rise.  They were getting ready to close the park to prepare it for a wedding and ballet concert.  People were in for a magical night.  We just had a great experience connecting with the ancient world.  We had visited Greece and didn’t have to leave Sicily.

In the valley of the Temples near the sea is where the Greeks built many temples over 2500 years ago. Near this ruined one is the best preserved temple of all.

Cardona – Medieval Castle

The Castle Walls & Towers

Cardona Castle’s history and mystique certainly make it the most amazing medieval fortress in Catalonia.

Sometimes the most romantic, exciting thing you can do is to plan as little as possible while on vacation. We decided, on this tour, until we got a feel for the region or city we were in, we would fly by the seat of our pants as much as possible. A good example of our “going with the flow” would be our stay at Cardona Castle. We saw another castle on the scenic drive to Andorra from Barcelona. It was sitting there in the mist on the side of the road, beckoning us to take that exit. Fortunately, or not, we drove past it, but we knew from that moment that a castle was certainly on our list of things to experience while in the Europe.

Stories

So, upon our return from Andorra we found ourselves making last minute reservations at www.parador.es which has an English version, and got quite the deal for under 30’s that night as well. Now Naia isn’t under 30 anymore… but Dan was still 29, until the end of November and needless to say, we took them up on their offer. So, it was not only one of the most hearty, history-rich fortresses around, it was affordable as well, and with the exchange rate, it was certainly a welcome gift from the powers that be. Winding up the long drive to the top allows you to see 10 miles around or more and, as expected, the sunset was spectacular. The building itself dates from the second century and it was strategically built next to a watch-tower over the Saline Valley. It belonged to the most powerful dynasty ruling between the tenth and seventeenth centuries. The Folch dynasty, heirs of Charlemagne, built this fortress, within the area that was known as “Marca Hispanica” (Border between the Spanish territories and the Muslim ones.) The Folch family ruled all the region and they owned at one point a total of twenty ports. Not too shabby for the good ol’ days, or now!

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The fortified, 9th Century fortress, within which the Parador (hotel) is located, conceals a 2nd Century tower and an 11th Century church. Inside the solid stone walls are comfortable, nicely decorated bedrooms, some with four-poster beds. The sparkling clean, marbled bathrooms are spacious, modern and well equipped for the tired traveler. Donned with an ample sized bath/shower as well as hair dryer and other amenities, like quality, yes actual quality shampoo/conditioner/lotion samplers we would actually use, the proprietors pulled out all of the stops. And why not? Frankly, we feel that doing something for the sheer enjoyment and use of the guest is the mark of a sharp hotel owner. The fact that they’re not wasting money on something you won’t use, because it’s not high enough quality, is smart. Also, it proves that they aren’t just for show either. The furniture in the drawing room was inspired from medieval times and helps to set the tone of the hotel. Throughout Cardona the antique furniture and rich decor works quite well with the castle itself. The reception is a beautiful space where there is internet access and cozy couches to regain your strength from a hard day of exploring the area.

When the sun went down, our stomachs woke up and hunger set into full gear, motivating us to take a quick shower to wash off the dust of the day’s explorations before we sought out our dinner. Someone was using the elevator, so we took the steps and couldn’t resist letting our minds wander once again to imagine what it must have been like to live back then… to hear the footsteps of soldiers in the stairwell… the sounds of children playing… Suddenly, we snapped out of our fantasyland when we heard the clinking of silverware and waiters popping corks, instantly causing us to be transported to the present. Upon arriving to the enormous dining area it is easy to imagine a grand ball taking place in the festively decorated dining room. We sat in the back corner and had the pleasure of simply feeling the room full of happy people eating the lovely fare and making merry. The holiday season was upon us and many people there were taking a long weekend break just before the Christmas rush set in at home. The Catalan cuisine is heavily influenced by an assortment of fresh forest mushrooms and a wide variety of homemade sausages and olives, all found locally. The dishes were deliciously prepared and gratefully enjoyed. The “butifarra con mongetes”, (sausage with beans), was lovely, as was the rest of the meal. The service was good and the staff was very friendly and it was quite apparent they were genuinely happy to be there, another trademark of excellent management and care taking of employees. Most staff we encountered at Cardona spoke English at least well enough to have short conversations and give directions and recommendations, which is always a plus as well.

Feeling happily, perfectly satiated, we retired for the evening as Asha was falling asleep in Dan’s arms and it was certainly time for us to examine the insides of our eyelids as well. The mattress and pillows were refreshingly comfortable and morning came too quickly. We were up early and went to the buffet breakfast, which offered a plentiful array of fresh juices, breads, fruits, yogurts, deli meats, sausages, eggs, muffins, croissants, jams, jellies, and more. It was tasty and we ate heartily before we embarked on a “special mission” to get pictures from all over the castle.

Dan’s second, OK… his third big love is History. He got “that look” when he found out that Cardona’s role in the War of Spanish Succession was amongst the most important to be played by any Catalan town. We spent about an hour or so going all over the castle taking pictures from the inside and outside. Out of windows, doors, off the top of balconies, snapping from all directions, trying to capture the feeling of the castle in shade and light. Showcasing her beautiful, if slightly rugged, charisma and class. The strategic and military importance of its fortifications enabled a resistance to be mounted in advance of Bourbon forces on several occasions during the conflict. The scene of this resistance was the town of Cardona itself and the castle.

Yes, before Naia could set up the first shot, Dan was heading up, up, up the stairs to the top of the tower with Asha, a giggling, one year old little explorer, on a quest to figure out which way the intruders must have approached. He continued on, musing about what it must have looked like and how the residents would have taken refuge in the castle and fought alongside the soldiers to defend it. He went on to tell us of three challenges that stood out as being particularly important amongst the events that took place here during the War, such was their magnitude: The siege in November and December 1711, the battles in August and October 1713 and the final capitulation of the castle, on September 18th 1714, a week later than that of Barcelona, when the rest of the country was already under the control of the Bourbon army. Looking out from the castle and it’s archer’s positions, you can just imagine, it must have been an amazing, harrowing time. We were seeing in our minds’ eyes showers of arrows zipping by us, hoping we wouldn’t be the unfortunate targets whose marks were hit.

The story of these three episodes goes something like this… Following the orders issued in Calaf by the French Duke of Vendome, Lt. General the Count of Muret went to Cordona with 25,000 troops. He took the town on November 17th, 1711, but not the castle, which was bombarded with cannon fire for thirty-four days. Imagine being shelled for thirty-four days and you will understand why we were taking all of the pictures. It is a fortress, indeed. During one of the fiercest engagements over the control of the castle, which took place at La Querosa and Els Escorials, Colonel Pere Muntaner-Damon i de Sacosta, who was in command of the castle’s troops, lost his life. Miraculously, despite this potential wrench in their plans, the troops held on for more than a month, until December 18th when the siege was finally lifted, thanks to the arrival of a large allied force commanded by Marshall Guido von Starhemberg and English General James Stanhope.

In August and October 1713, coinciding with the siege of Barcelona (1713 – 1714), Catalan troops under Manuel Desvalls, Military Governor of the castle, resisted two new offenses by the Bourbon forces under the Count of Montemar. Finally, on September 18th 1714, Manuel Desvalls i de Vergos was obliged to surrender the fortress, under the same conditions as those agreed for the capitulation of Barcelona on September 11th 1714.

We would like to return to Cardona Castle in the future to experience some of their seasonal offerings and to hear more of the stories of the many battles and those heroes and heroines of history we so often take for granted. Until next time, via con Dios Cardona!

{tab=Hotel / Accomodation}

Some of the hotel rooms have charming canopy beds. Pits, towers, walls and gothic features come together with a predominantly comfortable décor and Catalan-inspired mediaeval furnishings. Book Now!

  • Address: Castell de Cardona, s/n
  • Town/City: 08261 Cardona, Barcelona
  • Telephone: 00 34 938691275
  • Fax: 00 34 938691636
  • E-mail: [email protected]
  • Constuction style: Castle
  • Credit cards: American Express, Diners, JCB, Visa, MasterCard
  • Director: Jaime Sebastián Sánchez
  • Chef: Manuel Cubilla Moga

GENERAL SERVICES

  • Air Conditioning
  • Bar
  • Bureau de Change
  • Conference Suite
  • Credit Cards
  • Distance to Airport: 100 km.
  • Distance to Port: 100 km.
  • Distance to Train Station: 32 km.
  • Heating
  • Life
  • No animals allowed
  • Restaurant
  • Satellite Dish
  • Shop
  • BEDROOMS
    • Canal plus
    • Double Rooms (double beds): 5
    • Duplex: 2
    • Minibar
    • Places: 106
    • Rooms with Lounge Area: 3
    • Safety Deposit Box
    • Single Rooms: 2
    • Telephone in bedrooms
    • Television
    • Twin Rooms: 42
  • REST AND RELAXATION
    • Gym
    • Sauna

Dining & Food

Catalan cuisine is served in the dining room including aubergine terrine with pig’s trotters, selections of sausages and especially barbecue dishes with the braised lamb shoulder a highlight.

Eat like a true king at the Parador’s medieval dining room: Aubergine terrine with pig’s trotters, selections of sausages and specially barbecue dishes with local braised lamb shoulder a highlight Patatas enmascaradas (potatoes served with butifarra sausage and garlic) are a speciality. Hungry?

Activities

  • Solsonés Route (15 to 40 km.)
    • Romanesque architecture.
    • Museums.
    • Cardener fountain.
  • Cardona town.
    • Salt Mountain.
    • Cardonal Mediaeval Centre.
    • Salt Museum.
    • Romanesque architecture.
  • Montserrat (45 km.)
    • Montserrat Monastery.
    • Museum.
  • Parador.
    • Romanesque church from the 13th century.
    • Cloister.
    • 2nd century Minyona Tower.
    • Walls.
  • Bages Route (15 a 45 km.)
    • Romanesque architecture.
    • Museums.
    • Planetarium
  • Berguedá Route (30 a 60 km.)
    • Pyrenees.
    • Romanesque architecture.
    • Museums.
    • Llobregat fountains.

Local Festivals

  • Carnival: February, Solsona, 22 km.
  • Cardona annual festival: second Saturday in September, Cardona.
  • La Patum: Corpus, Berga, 31 km.

Paris… Falling in Love Again

Being completely honest, as is required in this job, I must say the last time I was in Paris I didn’t have the best of experiences.  Of course, it could have something to do with the fact that I never ventured out from the airport, but still, the amount of rudeness and underhandedness I experienced in an hour long layover, at Orly, was quite unbelievable.  As a matter of fact, the level of disdain I experienced there put me off for a full ten years from traveling to, or through, this mecca of romance.

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My husband, Dan, even had to coax me into going by mentioning all of the incredible art at the Louvre, the one museum I had really wanted to see in the EU.  I am exuberant to report that after my most recent trip, I happily stand corrected about Paris.  Today’s Paris has done a 180 degree turn on it’s heels.  People everywhere were polite and genuinely friendly.  I hadn’t ever known any other European city to be so open and friendly to tourists.  All of the people in Paris were so friendly it was absolutely shocking, but in a good way.

I think most people have heard that France, Paris in particular, being full of rude, racist and obnoxious people just lurking in the shadows, waiting for their opportunity to spew their venom on you.  Not so today, however, something tells me that was a more probable scenario before the internet took over.  Now because of the social aspect of the web, people have friends all over the world and it’s making a difference, a big difference.

Paris is certainly one of the capital cities of the Modern Age.  So much is going on 24/7, it’s dizzying.  It certainly rivals New York City for it’s pace, friendliness and style.  The only thing we didn’t see were blinking neon signs of those famous NYC “Open All Night” restaurants, but I bet they were there.  What with all the different attractions, incredible restaurants, mix of cultures and such a long history, you might need a year to just start to scratch the surface of all of the wonders that are Paris.

I realized something very important on this leg of our Europe trip.  The difference between my last trip to France and this one is simple.  Today’s French are really beginning to fall in love all over again…  with Paris, their country and the world, and why shouldn’t they?  The grandeur that is Paris can be seen in it’s magnificent palaces, museums, government buildings and the art that seems to be seeping from just about everywhere.  Also, the French are obsessed with lovemaking.  Well, again, they should be.   Didn’t they invent it or something?  After all, how sensual is it to be surrounded by the most famous architecture? How about the “ahh factor” of shopping in some of the most unique of boutiques or drink an award winning wine, neither of which need be the most expensive?   Mind you, if you want to go full tilt then there is a scotch that goes for $1200 USD per shot most recently consumed by our friend, Greg with his uncle in Paris.

Most people who have been to France understand when I say that there is a heaven on Earth and it’s the smell of the freshly baked baguettes, flakey croissants, and other treats on offer at the local patisserie.  It might as well be the equivalent of culinary Chanel wafting through the air first thing in the morning, or whenever you happen to be hungry.  It is downright Pavlovian.  It’s practically foreplay when you eat the oh-so-delicate, but rich, saucy French food, and of course parlez francais all the while, even if you’re messing up the words!  It’s no wonder that Paris is one of the cultural capitals of the world.  France, in general, certainly holds it’s own as one of the most amazing places on the planet.  Having a very good standard of living as well as the best health care system in the world really does make a difference in the way you experience your life.

Stories

We took the first class train from Brussels and arrived into the Gard Du Nord, (North Garage), on a high speed train that had WIFI available. (Dan was elated to have a decent internet connection).  Also, I should note that traveling by train first class is much easier and worth the extra couple hundred dollars you will spend.  We felt comfortable immediately in Paris because we were able to study the map to easily locate our accommodations. It was just a short walk from the station and on a quiet side street. Like something out of a movie, our host actually greeted us by name as we walked through the door.  He was incredibly nice and very helpful. He  made a point to give us plenty of good advice about where to find things like wipees, diapers and where to go to eat. Our room was small, but smartly decorated with the latest interior design textures and colors. Another thing that was nice, it used the limited space well.  All of the necessary amenities were to be found in it’s new bathroom , including a hair dryer, towel drying rack and the latest deco style sink.  The bedroom  had a work area with a desk and a solid internet connection, something you don’t always find when traveling in the EU. The windows looking out over the street really reminded you of the Bohemian Paris we have seen on the big screen.  We relaxed in the room for a couple hours before leaving to find our dining spot.  We both remarked how it was amazing to think that earlier that day we had been in Brussels and took two trains. It was a weird feeling.  Because of the closeness of all of the countries in Europe, we realized we had visited four countries in two days.

Our concierge gave us the name of a restaurant down the street that had tasty traditional food and really good service.  Our magical Parisian adventure began there when we sat next to two sisters and their brother at the communal eating table.  We began sharing stories and practicing our French with them. They spoke a bit of English, which made things fun. It seemed that the more wine the group consumed, the better everyone understood each other.  Certainly this was a tradition that was well proven all throughout Europe for the last several thousand years and probably helped to keep things peaceful most of the time between the different cultures.

After a couple hours of eating and making merry, we told them we were to meet a friend from California at the L’Arc de Triomphe at 11 a.m. the next day.  Emmanuelle, one of the sisters, said she would meet us and take us all on a bit of a tour.  She then divulged how much she loved the city and has written two books, both in French ,for the first time French visitor to Paris.  I know my eyes must have widened.  We were so excited because these were the only two days we had booked in Paris and we were concerned about having enough time to get a good overview of the city.  We were stunned by her generosity and couldn’t hardly wait to see where we would be exploring.

The next morning we wandered down to the metro and jumped a train out to The Arc. Every person we talked to was very friendly in helping us find our way around. An old man was so pleased he helped us find our way to the stairs to go to under the road to the Arc.  He said, in French, that he used to live in Florida for about twenty years and then moved back to Paris.  The L’Arc de Triomphe is quite large and is decorated with statues from many places.  We met Greg and Emmanuelle under it.  Both Dan and I thought that it seemed so surreal to actually be there. It had been a life long dream to visit Paris and it was already surpassing our expectations.

French Deli
French Deli

Our route around the city included a walk down to the Champs Elyees from the Arc and then to the Obelisk. Our new friend, Emmanuelle, took us to a small garden that was her favourite. It was a lovely little garden with plenty of colorful flowers. We also wanted to experience a local lunch meal. So, we went on a bit of an adventure on the Metro, to the little restaurant, across from the oldest home in Paris, which served whatever the chef wanted to cook that day. It was very good and really inexpensive for the quality and amount of food. Our meal included your choice of three entrees, a piece of fantastic chocolate cake and a drink for about 8 euros.   Please take notice that this place was so hidden that we would never be able to find our way back there without Emmanuelle.

We headed back to the Metro and found ourselves at the Lourve.  We walked through the courtyards in awe. The old palace was quite a building. Like most buildings it was between three and five stories high. It was covered in statues and windows. We passed through the few courtyards to get to the riverside. We found that it was just incredible how big this museum is in comparison with any other building around it.

Next it was on to Notre Dame where we explored a bit and took pictures of the statues.  Dan found it quite dark inside.  I stayed outside with our little girl. It was definitely a Paris landmark that needed to be seen. On the river below the church we took a boat ride up to the Effiel Tower and back.  We should have taken the Hop On / Hop Off boat so we could have gotten off there but there weren’t any available.  I would say to call ahead for that activity as they do book up quickly.

Back at Notre Dame we got off the boat and decided it was a good time to to head up to Montmarte and the Sacre Coeur Cathedral. We stopped in Montmarte and our Parisian Guide left us at the bottom of the hill. We promised to keep in touch and thanked her for the wonderful tour of the city.

The view from the cathedral is amazing and you can see a great deal of Paris from up there. The artistry on the roof of the cathedral is beautiful. Back down the hill a little ways there is an artists area where painters and sketchers were doing portraits. It was a bit touristy area but we sat down for a meal anyways. The meal prices were definitely a lot more up here then what we had so far.

As we passed through the tent to our seat I saw the crepes being served. They looked so good that I was thinking about getting one. My wife took the lead and ordered me pasta instead while I was out walking the little girl. This was a bit annoying since we head to Italy the next day for 3 weeks and I wanted to get in as much of the local dishes as possible. I sent the pasta back and got my crepes with the egg on top. It was enjoyed!

Unfortunately, one of my traveling companions left some important items in the restaurant’s seats while I was out walking with the girl. Although this traveling companion does not agree at all. It is still a point of contention. My hat, later to be known as Wilson, was lost in Montemarte for a day. It missed the train to Florence.

We wished our friend from California good night and took the metro back to our hotel. It was a wonderful 2 nights in Paris.

The next morning we caught a taxi early in the morning to Gare du Lyon for our journey into Italy.

Arc de Triomphe

The Arc de Triomphe stands in the center of Place Charles de Gaulle at the western end of the Champs-Elysees. It is an arch that honors those who fought for France during the Napoleonic Wars. It also houses underneath the tomb of the unknown soldier from WWI.

The Arc displays young french nudes against chain mail bearded German warriors. It is the second largest triumphal arch in existence at 162 feet tall and 148 feet wide. It is so large that a plane was able to fly through it and was captured on video. It was commissioned in 1806 after a victory of Napoleon at Austerlitz.

Notre Dame

Notre Dame first stone was begun in 1163 has been updated and modified each century since. The North and South Tower were completed in 1240 & 1250 respectively. The church is dedicated to the Virgin Mary.

This model of Notre Dame is a scaled and is set with every detail as the real one. Reviewing this allows you to see the detail work that you are unable to see from the ground.

Lourve

Classical statues fill this gallery which is one of the few rooms that can be seen without paying an entrance fee to the museum. As heard in the audio this would be a great place to have a scene from a James Bond movie.

The museum is located by the river Seine in Paris and is the world’s most visited museum. It has an exhibition area of over 60,600 sq meters. The building was extended and added onto many times. It started as a fortress in the 12th century which is still visible. The latest addition which is the glass Pyramids give light to the lower reception and ticketing area.

Napoleon’s Obelisk

This obelisk was originally erected in front of the Luxor temple in the 13th Century BC. It was transported in the 19th century to Paris. Although it was attributed to Napoleon it didn’t arrive in Paris until 1836. This is one of the three obelisks that were given to the great western cities of New York, London and Paris.

Sacre-Coeur

The view from Sacre-Coeur Basilica is located at the top of Montmarte which is the highest point in the city. The basilica finished in 1913 has become a focal point for people to relax after a busy day and listen to music on the steps to enjoy that view.

Brussels

We walked out of the train station and were thrust into the heart of the multicultural city. Brussels is beautiful, small and fast paced. Our friend nearly got run over in his wheelchair! Purely by chance did Naia say something just in time. So if you are going to Brussels, keep your eye out for drivers who might not be looking for you, whether you are on foot or on bike.

One of the “Wow” moments of all our traveling in Europe was when we saw the Grand Palace and the overall staggering amount of gold in the city of Brussels. Because of thievery, the gold you see in most artwork and architecture is now maintained with gold paint where there used to be gold leaf, like on their government buildings, and if you’re looking for it you’ll see it in other less conspicuous spots as well. Honestly, each time we turned a corner it felt like the architecture was almost morphing into something out of our dreams about what that era must have been like… each building was more amazing than the last building we had just drooled over, and they just kept coming with each new block. Ah, Brussels!

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Stories

Like France and Italy, Brussels’ small streets contain many small, family-owned cafes and restaurants of distinction and impressive quality, offering a cornucopia of delight for every palette. Given the fact that we only had an afternoon in the chocolate and waffle capital of the world, we felt a wave of excitement when we realized we had to begin sampling right away! Plus, we could resist the dalliance of the scent of freshly cooked waffles wafting past our noses no longer and were drawn to a little roadside cafe. We immediately decided on beer and waffles. Ok, truth be known, the boys, Dan and our Dutch friend, Freek, had the alcoholic libations while Naia had a silky-smooth, coat your throat with divinity, perfect drinking temperature hot chocolate, which was one of the things on her list to experience while there. She liked it. She liked it a lot. She had to kick Dan under the table to keep him from drinking all of her cocoa, which meant it had his seal of approval! Naia took a sip of the beer which was a nice light/medium lager but didn’t go too well with the cocoa, however it went well with the waffles, according to Dan and Freek, (pronounced ‘Frake’).

Matter of factly, the waffles were excellent. Our friend started Van’s Waffles and described them perfectly to me one time. “Slightly crispy on the outside and heavenly on the inside.” They felt so light and fluffy it made us wonder if we were in a dream… and then came out the strawberries and cream on the side! Perfection on a plate. A lovely time was had by all. Naia had decided to make a short list of a few things we could try while in Belgium. Some rich, dark chocolate covered almonds would prove to be a more difficult find than the perfect hot cocoa. Apparently dark chocolate powdered nuts are all the rage in Brussels. Naia was looking for smooth, shiny, dark chocolate covered almonds. They are naturally lower in fat, sugar and guilt!

Wondering what to do after our little culinary distraction, while outside the Grand Palace, we spotted the post cards. It was obvious that there is a love of statues here. Surprisingly, you can tell a lot about a place from the postcards. Let us just say that Belgians are distinct from their other EU neighbors. They will put up a statue of a little kid taking a leak and like magic, somehow it becomes a national landmark. Go figure. So, given this oddity, we had decided that our grand quest of the day was to find a statue of a peeing boy. Our not so grand, but would still be fun to accomplish, quests were the dark chocolate almonds and to experience some regular Belgian food. The boys also had their quest to be a little groggy from all of the grog by the time we had to get back on the train, which proved later to be a bit of a challenge. Not the drinking part, but the getting on the train part!

After finishing such a not-so-healthy treat, we needed to walk off the evil, but tasty, sugar, fat and calories. We went off on our adventure, the three of us and Asha. Overall, the city center was well planned out and easy to navigate. Thankfully, there were signs directing us to every place we wanted to see and a map was not necessary. Amsterdam could take a lesson from Brussels in making it user friendly to the tourists! It’s very easy to get lost in Amsterdam when you are just visiting. We headed down to the Grand Palace and saw the bar that has 2001 different Belgian beers. The boys thought they should leave it for the next visit or they might have to call a cab! The LIttle Peer, as Naia dubbed him, was next to a shop where we got our chocolate almonds and, had we known this, we would have found The Little Peer a lot sooner. We spent about an hour and a half with Naia going into every chocolate store on the way to the peeing boy but no such luck. It was only after we found him and threw some pennies into the fountain that we scored the chocolate! Good thing we’re not superstitious!

Finally, the third quest was to be fulfilled. Ah… success! Freek, (pronounced ‘Frake’), took us to eat french fries but Belgian style while we were waiting near the train station. We were early. Naia nibbled on one, just to say she had them, while Dan and Freek devoured the dish. All three of us concluded that they were indeed tasty and also completely unhealthy. Perhaps next time we can explore the healthy chefs of the EU instead? Hmmm?

Train Station

Oh and by the way, there is one thing to remember when traveling by train in the EU, or just about anywhere these days for that matter. The station you arrived at when coming to Brussels isn’t necessarily the one you will use to leave Brussels! Hahahah! Yep, we were waiting outside the wrong station! Simply make sure to check the train tickets for which station train departs from so that you don’t miss it. Our train to Paris left from a different station than our arrival. We didn’t realize this and we were waiting for a train that was never going to come since it was at a different station! Many European cities have more then 1 train station, depending on which direction they are traveling. It was a bit of a crazy journey but we made it to the correct station and caught the train just in time. It was the only train we took in our seven weeks in the EU that had wifi access. Aside from getting some emails done, Dan really liked it because he could map out directions to our hotel, which really helped make us feel more at home when we walked out of the Gare Du Nord in Paris. Leave it up to the Belgians to do the finest things in life just a bit finer.

Food & Dining

Small streets lined with restaurants cafes and pubs are like barnacles on the bottom of a boat… literally one on top of another! There is barely enough room to get through and it goes on for many blocks in every direction and it’s delish!

Shopping Arcade

This glass covered shopping arcade is the oldest in Europe. Sint-Hubertus gallery was built in 1846 is just northeast of the Grand Palace. Eight of these galleries were built but only 3 has survived. The lower level has shops and the upper levels have apartments and condos.


 

Central Square

The Central Square is the heart of Brussels. It contains the Grand Palace and often hosts a busy market. It is claimed to be one of the most beautiful town squares in the world. In 1695 the square was bombed to ruins and was rebuilt completely by the commercial guilds.

 

St. Louis´ Other Wild Side

Japanese Garden

Immersed, I took in the sounds of screeching birds and pushed huge leaves from my path as I made my way to investigate the bursts of color that were still just a blur in the distance. I pressed on. After dodging the occasional puddle, I discovered the tropical pink pineapples, deep violet banana blossoms sprouting from their tree top perches some 25-feet above me and bright white orchids, all sprinkled with water droplets. The air felt even more moist than the flowers looked and I realized it was at least 20 degrees hotter than only just moments ago, yet somehow the sound of rushing streams made it seem less sweltering. As I wiped the sweat from my forehead, I almost forgot this was early March in downtown St. Louis.

Ottoman Garden
Ottoman Garden

I thought to myself that a botanical garden was an entertainment option most people don’t take advantage of in the big city. It was then that I realized that St. Louis was more than an arch, blues and riverboat gambling—it could be a natural oasis too. The Missouri Botanical Garden’s Climatron Conservatory hosts not only these plants but also displays an array of exotic animals, like poison frogs and puffer fish, and is just one of the 31 gardens and conservatories that stretch over some seventy-nine acres.

When back outdoors, I followed a walkway through electric blue magnolias and fountains, going from garden to garden and it even afforded me a pass by the 1850s Victorian estate of Englishman Henry Shaw, who founded the garden in 1859.

The English Woodland Garden certainly made up in aroma what it lacked in color. Among the simple green and brown, with only an occasional burst of yellow daffodils, I felt my eyes almost sting from the strong pine scent. The Boxwood Garden was full of walled hedges arranged in a maze I could have easily gotten lost in had they been taller than my knee. Manicured in the shape of an ancient emblem, this garden seemed to be stolen right out of another time. I stayed longer there than I did at any other garden, taking my time admiring the precision and craftsman ship—and resting.

Japanese Garden
Japanese Garden

After a break, I was eager to see the famous Seiwa-en Japanese landscape garden and it wasn’t long before I started noticing the perfectly rounded bushes and carefully drawn lines in the sand around them, known as Karesansui. Amidst the stone walkways and willows exploding in lavender blossoms was an old bridge where I fed the hungry aquatic animals below. I tossed the food over the side and had to laugh as I watched the ducks in fierce competition for my meager gifts of sustenance with the giant koi fish, who were considerably bigger. The downfall of this visit, aside from sore legs, was that I came too early to see the orchid show, which employees say is a favorite among visitors, who come from all over the world. They´ve met people who come from as far away as South Africa. Not bad for $8 a head, leg workout included free of charge.

The next day I found myself wiping my brow again as I entered the tropical conservatory at the Butterfly House in Faust Park. Approximately 60 species of butterflies from all over the world filled the room. Their sizes varied from as small as my palm to as big as my hand. Amongst the huge tropical plants, flashes of blood red, black, lime green, lemon yellow, purple and light and dark blues appeared and disappeared in the same instant right in front of me making the experience as nerve-racking as it was exhilarating, mostly because of the caution signs warning not to touch the butterflies, as it could injure or kill them. I found myself adopting a walking rhythm of slow, leery starts and panicked, abrupt stops when one would dart out in front of me. I regretted bringing my purse too. After a few accidental swings and close calls, I learned to keep it clutched to my side. Elsewhere in the Butterfly House are some not so desirable creatures like giant cockroaches, rhinoceros beetles and millipedes. The House, started eight years ago by Sohpia M. Sachs, is an educational facility, after all. So, though I groaned through it making faces, I figured it is only fair to display a full range of the Earth’s bugs, beautiful or not and I can put up with anything with a mere $6 admission.

The place that was most expensive and farthest to get to may have been the best of all three. The Meramec Caverns, located in Stanton, Mo., an hour outside the city, opened to the public in 1933. Further exploration revealed 26 miles of underground passages and as I found out, those 26 miles held a past full of rich history, natural phenomena and, surprisingly, pop culture.

It was the first time on this trip I was chilly as my tour group entered the first and largest of the cave’s rooms—the ballroom. It is not a nickname. Socials were held here in the 1930s as much as Boy Scout meetings are today. Complete with a disco ball, it houses up to 3,000 people. As green, blue, yellow and red lights lit the way, we were led through winding walkways with some low ceilings and up 58 slippery steps, which the guide later admitted to me was tourists’ least favorite part. One of our first stops was at Loot Rock, where Jesse James and his crew hid out from police. A million scenarios ran through my mind when the tour guide the pointed out the bear dens no more than ten feet away from it. We were also shown secret places where gun powder was made during the Civil War.

Hollywood has even been attracted to the cave on occasion. We were shown the spots where scenes were shot for Lassie, the famous fight between Tom Sawyer and Injun Joe in the film Tom and Huck and an episode of the show People Are Funny, in which two newlyweds got tricked into staying in one of the caves for a ten-day honeymoon.

It is a magnificent cavern that extends 364 feet below the ground and seven stories above it. The most fascinating parts of the tour for me were the formations, taking on shapes of a wine table, a curtain of stalactites up to 70 feet long and Onyx Mountain. This 33 million year old underground mountain is the 3rd largest in the world. While one side glows in peach, white and pale blue hues, the other side was black and dying from a lack of oxygen. Maybe the most intriguing feature of all was what the locals affectionately call Adam and Eve, a stalactite and stalagmite directly aligned and are the closest in the world to meeting and forming a column. On my way out, I decided that I would pay another $15 and do it all over again if I didn’t have to be back home the next day.

These special places showed me people can escape tourist traps and get to see what else there is to a big city other than concrete and congestion. When I looked past the typical big buildings, crowded bars and constant road rage, I found a whole new wild side to St. Louis.

Up, Up and Away with Quique Dacosta

Quique Dacosta has been one of the skyrocketing new generation leaders of traditional Spanish vanguard signature cuisine in the past few years and at the age of 37, he has been experimenting and researching for example, the uses of aloe vera plants in their embryonic stage. He didn’t know if aloe vera was even edible at that point during it’s development when he began his trials.  However, he had known of it’s emulsifying properties. He told me, it was simply a process of trial and error until he managed to create the delectably edible. His investigative spirit has earned him global recognition, a host of awards and two well earned Michelin stars.

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He totally understands that Spain’s current status is not due to chance. He is part of the 4th generation of Spanish chefs who embrace and expound gratitude for those who came before them. Being at the very pinnacle of the vanguard epicurean movement, he continues breaking free, without boundaries, and his design aesthetics are all a part of Dacosta’s impeccably flawless creations, including his re-engineering and transformation of the live sensations and aromas of surf and turf, utilizing the most cutting edge, marvelous products on the market to do so.

Face to Face at El Poblet

  • Mar: Firstly, how would you describe your cuisine?
  • Quique: Vanguard Spanish cooking.
  • Mar: The economic crisis and El Poblet?
  • Quique: I believe it is somewhat complicated for my team, my clients and I was born during a recessive economy so I have had to be more prudent. Nevertheless, we shall overcome this.
  • Mar: Define your palate.
  • Quique: I do not have a favourite dish or preferred flavour. I like just about all.
  • Mar: Can you tell us about your star ingredients?
  • Quique: To name a few: marine algaes, sea lettuces, almonds, Valencian oranges, embryonic vegetables, tuna belly, sea urchins, Dénia red prawns and the Diabetic Green Sugar plant.
  • Mar: What motivated your culinary career?
  • Quique: By accident actually. I arrived in Dénia from Jarandilla de La Vera to spend a summer vacation when I was 14. I was terribly bored and didn’t know anybody. I decided to get a part time job at the local pizzeria. This had been my first contact with a restaurant. It was not exactly a culinary position, however, it sparked the flames of culinary interest.
  • Mar: Tell us about your latest bill of fare.
  • Quique: The idea was initially very clear and quintessential. I have reconstructed Montgó Nature Reserve and the shore, that is to transform the live sensations and the aromas utilising marvelous culinary products and state of the art kitchen equipment.

The Latest Taster’s Carte

  • Snack, crackle & crisp toast snacks: Reggiano Parmesano, Black olive, Walnut, Greek Phyllo and Dried Fruits
  • Trufa blanca de Montgó: White truffles filled with parmesano, fresh goat cheese & blended with white truffles and sprinkled with 5 wild mushroom dust
  • La Bruma: Steamed snow peas, baby lima beans, embryonic stage sweet peas, aromatic herbs, pinenuts and sprouts in a garden steamed
  • Moshi: Cockles, langoustines and pansies in broth.
  • Impresionismo La Roca: Fresh oysters and baby squid in gel
  • Expresionismo rojo: Inspired by painter Mark Rotho, red mullet with saffron
  • Dessert 1: Budding cherries with crumbs of pastry
  • Dessert 2: Green melon, cantaloupe, dried fruits and mandarin smear

Additionally, there were 5 white wines that paired perfectly. “Our point of view? It was a magical experience in every aspect.”


CHEF QUIQUE DACOSTA
Restaurant El Poblet

Centre Les Marines
Km 2.5
Dénia, Alicante
Reservations: 96. 557. 4179
Website:Restaurant El Poblet
 

Email: Restaurant and Reservations