"Criadillas" AKA: Rocky Mountain Oysters or Potatoes?

We’re crazy for criadillas! There are two types of criadillas in Spain, one is flora and one is fauna. Let’s start with the fauna first. Spanish bulls are known for their fierceness in the ring and their testicles are fantastic when done up in the fryer! Affectionately known in the USA as “bull’s balls” or “rocky mountain oysters”, in Spain criadillas, also called huevos de toro (“bull’s eggs”), are a delicacy, albeit an unusual one. They are rumoured to give the male that consumes them superior performance in the bedroom!  Fortunately this delicacy is first removed from the bull at slaughter and later pounded, floured, spiced and fried and finally end up as an hors d’oeuvre with a perfect cocktail sauce to compliment.

They share the same name.

The second type is a Peruvian potato variety affectionately called criadillas that made it’s way to Europe in the 1500’s!  Spain is known the world over for it’s numerous varieties of potatoes. This fact probably, at least partially, explains why five of the world’s top ten chefs are to be found in Spain. The spuds known as criadillas are no stranger to the cuisine-conscious Spaniards and have an amazing texture which is used as a foundation for several meat and fish dishes. They are versatile, creamy and coveted amongst the European haute cuisine crowd.

 

Cardona – Medieval Castle

The Castle Walls & Towers

Cardona Castle’s history and mystique certainly make it the most amazing medieval fortress in Catalonia.

Sometimes the most romantic, exciting thing you can do is to plan as little as possible while on vacation. We decided, on this tour, until we got a feel for the region or city we were in, we would fly by the seat of our pants as much as possible. A good example of our “going with the flow” would be our stay at Cardona Castle. We saw another castle on the scenic drive to Andorra from Barcelona. It was sitting there in the mist on the side of the road, beckoning us to take that exit. Fortunately, or not, we drove past it, but we knew from that moment that a castle was certainly on our list of things to experience while in the Europe.

Stories

So, upon our return from Andorra we found ourselves making last minute reservations at www.parador.es which has an English version, and got quite the deal for under 30’s that night as well. Now Naia isn’t under 30 anymore… but Dan was still 29, until the end of November and needless to say, we took them up on their offer. So, it was not only one of the most hearty, history-rich fortresses around, it was affordable as well, and with the exchange rate, it was certainly a welcome gift from the powers that be. Winding up the long drive to the top allows you to see 10 miles around or more and, as expected, the sunset was spectacular. The building itself dates from the second century and it was strategically built next to a watch-tower over the Saline Valley. It belonged to the most powerful dynasty ruling between the tenth and seventeenth centuries. The Folch dynasty, heirs of Charlemagne, built this fortress, within the area that was known as “Marca Hispanica” (Border between the Spanish territories and the Muslim ones.) The Folch family ruled all the region and they owned at one point a total of twenty ports. Not too shabby for the good ol’ days, or now!

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The fortified, 9th Century fortress, within which the Parador (hotel) is located, conceals a 2nd Century tower and an 11th Century church. Inside the solid stone walls are comfortable, nicely decorated bedrooms, some with four-poster beds. The sparkling clean, marbled bathrooms are spacious, modern and well equipped for the tired traveler. Donned with an ample sized bath/shower as well as hair dryer and other amenities, like quality, yes actual quality shampoo/conditioner/lotion samplers we would actually use, the proprietors pulled out all of the stops. And why not? Frankly, we feel that doing something for the sheer enjoyment and use of the guest is the mark of a sharp hotel owner. The fact that they’re not wasting money on something you won’t use, because it’s not high enough quality, is smart. Also, it proves that they aren’t just for show either. The furniture in the drawing room was inspired from medieval times and helps to set the tone of the hotel. Throughout Cardona the antique furniture and rich decor works quite well with the castle itself. The reception is a beautiful space where there is internet access and cozy couches to regain your strength from a hard day of exploring the area.

When the sun went down, our stomachs woke up and hunger set into full gear, motivating us to take a quick shower to wash off the dust of the day’s explorations before we sought out our dinner. Someone was using the elevator, so we took the steps and couldn’t resist letting our minds wander once again to imagine what it must have been like to live back then… to hear the footsteps of soldiers in the stairwell… the sounds of children playing… Suddenly, we snapped out of our fantasyland when we heard the clinking of silverware and waiters popping corks, instantly causing us to be transported to the present. Upon arriving to the enormous dining area it is easy to imagine a grand ball taking place in the festively decorated dining room. We sat in the back corner and had the pleasure of simply feeling the room full of happy people eating the lovely fare and making merry. The holiday season was upon us and many people there were taking a long weekend break just before the Christmas rush set in at home. The Catalan cuisine is heavily influenced by an assortment of fresh forest mushrooms and a wide variety of homemade sausages and olives, all found locally. The dishes were deliciously prepared and gratefully enjoyed. The “butifarra con mongetes”, (sausage with beans), was lovely, as was the rest of the meal. The service was good and the staff was very friendly and it was quite apparent they were genuinely happy to be there, another trademark of excellent management and care taking of employees. Most staff we encountered at Cardona spoke English at least well enough to have short conversations and give directions and recommendations, which is always a plus as well.

Feeling happily, perfectly satiated, we retired for the evening as Asha was falling asleep in Dan’s arms and it was certainly time for us to examine the insides of our eyelids as well. The mattress and pillows were refreshingly comfortable and morning came too quickly. We were up early and went to the buffet breakfast, which offered a plentiful array of fresh juices, breads, fruits, yogurts, deli meats, sausages, eggs, muffins, croissants, jams, jellies, and more. It was tasty and we ate heartily before we embarked on a “special mission” to get pictures from all over the castle.

Dan’s second, OK… his third big love is History. He got “that look” when he found out that Cardona’s role in the War of Spanish Succession was amongst the most important to be played by any Catalan town. We spent about an hour or so going all over the castle taking pictures from the inside and outside. Out of windows, doors, off the top of balconies, snapping from all directions, trying to capture the feeling of the castle in shade and light. Showcasing her beautiful, if slightly rugged, charisma and class. The strategic and military importance of its fortifications enabled a resistance to be mounted in advance of Bourbon forces on several occasions during the conflict. The scene of this resistance was the town of Cardona itself and the castle.

Yes, before Naia could set up the first shot, Dan was heading up, up, up the stairs to the top of the tower with Asha, a giggling, one year old little explorer, on a quest to figure out which way the intruders must have approached. He continued on, musing about what it must have looked like and how the residents would have taken refuge in the castle and fought alongside the soldiers to defend it. He went on to tell us of three challenges that stood out as being particularly important amongst the events that took place here during the War, such was their magnitude: The siege in November and December 1711, the battles in August and October 1713 and the final capitulation of the castle, on September 18th 1714, a week later than that of Barcelona, when the rest of the country was already under the control of the Bourbon army. Looking out from the castle and it’s archer’s positions, you can just imagine, it must have been an amazing, harrowing time. We were seeing in our minds’ eyes showers of arrows zipping by us, hoping we wouldn’t be the unfortunate targets whose marks were hit.

The story of these three episodes goes something like this… Following the orders issued in Calaf by the French Duke of Vendome, Lt. General the Count of Muret went to Cordona with 25,000 troops. He took the town on November 17th, 1711, but not the castle, which was bombarded with cannon fire for thirty-four days. Imagine being shelled for thirty-four days and you will understand why we were taking all of the pictures. It is a fortress, indeed. During one of the fiercest engagements over the control of the castle, which took place at La Querosa and Els Escorials, Colonel Pere Muntaner-Damon i de Sacosta, who was in command of the castle’s troops, lost his life. Miraculously, despite this potential wrench in their plans, the troops held on for more than a month, until December 18th when the siege was finally lifted, thanks to the arrival of a large allied force commanded by Marshall Guido von Starhemberg and English General James Stanhope.

In August and October 1713, coinciding with the siege of Barcelona (1713 – 1714), Catalan troops under Manuel Desvalls, Military Governor of the castle, resisted two new offenses by the Bourbon forces under the Count of Montemar. Finally, on September 18th 1714, Manuel Desvalls i de Vergos was obliged to surrender the fortress, under the same conditions as those agreed for the capitulation of Barcelona on September 11th 1714.

We would like to return to Cardona Castle in the future to experience some of their seasonal offerings and to hear more of the stories of the many battles and those heroes and heroines of history we so often take for granted. Until next time, via con Dios Cardona!

{tab=Hotel / Accomodation}

Some of the hotel rooms have charming canopy beds. Pits, towers, walls and gothic features come together with a predominantly comfortable décor and Catalan-inspired mediaeval furnishings. Book Now!

  • Address: Castell de Cardona, s/n
  • Town/City: 08261 Cardona, Barcelona
  • Telephone: 00 34 938691275
  • Fax: 00 34 938691636
  • E-mail: [email protected]
  • Constuction style: Castle
  • Credit cards: American Express, Diners, JCB, Visa, MasterCard
  • Director: Jaime Sebastián Sánchez
  • Chef: Manuel Cubilla Moga

GENERAL SERVICES

  • Air Conditioning
  • Bar
  • Bureau de Change
  • Conference Suite
  • Credit Cards
  • Distance to Airport: 100 km.
  • Distance to Port: 100 km.
  • Distance to Train Station: 32 km.
  • Heating
  • Life
  • No animals allowed
  • Restaurant
  • Satellite Dish
  • Shop
  • BEDROOMS
    • Canal plus
    • Double Rooms (double beds): 5
    • Duplex: 2
    • Minibar
    • Places: 106
    • Rooms with Lounge Area: 3
    • Safety Deposit Box
    • Single Rooms: 2
    • Telephone in bedrooms
    • Television
    • Twin Rooms: 42
  • REST AND RELAXATION
    • Gym
    • Sauna

Dining & Food

Catalan cuisine is served in the dining room including aubergine terrine with pig’s trotters, selections of sausages and especially barbecue dishes with the braised lamb shoulder a highlight.

Eat like a true king at the Parador’s medieval dining room: Aubergine terrine with pig’s trotters, selections of sausages and specially barbecue dishes with local braised lamb shoulder a highlight Patatas enmascaradas (potatoes served with butifarra sausage and garlic) are a speciality. Hungry?

Activities

  • Solsonés Route (15 to 40 km.)
    • Romanesque architecture.
    • Museums.
    • Cardener fountain.
  • Cardona town.
    • Salt Mountain.
    • Cardonal Mediaeval Centre.
    • Salt Museum.
    • Romanesque architecture.
  • Montserrat (45 km.)
    • Montserrat Monastery.
    • Museum.
  • Parador.
    • Romanesque church from the 13th century.
    • Cloister.
    • 2nd century Minyona Tower.
    • Walls.
  • Bages Route (15 a 45 km.)
    • Romanesque architecture.
    • Museums.
    • Planetarium
  • Berguedá Route (30 a 60 km.)
    • Pyrenees.
    • Romanesque architecture.
    • Museums.
    • Llobregat fountains.

Local Festivals

  • Carnival: February, Solsona, 22 km.
  • Cardona annual festival: second Saturday in September, Cardona.
  • La Patum: Corpus, Berga, 31 km.

Europe, A Quick Introduction

Travel Through Europe

Travel Through Europe

Our travels to Europe started in late August 2008. It would be my husband’s first adventure on another continent. The trip we dreamed up would allow us to experience a good overview of the western side of the continent, visit the major western cities like Amsterdam, Paris, Florence, Rome, Barcelona and Madrid in style, but without having to sell our first born to do it. Since we had our cute little eight month old baby along for the trip, this was imperative! I had already been to England, Ireland, Denmark, Germany, Northern Italy and the South of France. We wanted to make sure we didn’t repeat any spot I’d stayed in already so that the trip would be equally exciting for both of us. We had an incredibly tight schedule. We had to be back in the U.S. to go to North Carolina to meet at our friend, Bud’s beach house in Nags Head. My family would be meeting us there in a mere 6 weeks. Looking back now, our journey to the EU was simply incredible and we definitely are planning on going back, maybe even living there.

Below are the countries and the places we visited during our trip of a lifetime in Europe. The countries and the cities listed are in order of visitation. We visited 8 countries and 9 major cities if you include the Vatican and Vatican City as ones. We spent at most only 6 days in one location which made the trip seem to go by pretty fast.

Netherlands

We started our tour of Holland by staying in an apartment in Amsterdam, on the canals, for a few days to shake off the jet lag, which is a formidable opponent, then moved onto Kampen and the province of Overijessel. Our reasons for visiting this area were numerous but the main reasons were friends who lived there and the fact that Dan’s father lived there until he moved to Canada at age 7, right after WWII. We then traveled down to the south of the Netherlands to Maastricht to check out one of the oldest cities in Holland. We made Maastricht our base for day trips to Cologne and Brussels.

Germany

Cologne was our only stop in Germany and it was for just one day. Our goal here was to visit the cathedral, eat some good German sausages and sample the beer. We had a great day and it was a packed one with lots of adventure.

Belgium

We spent only an afternoon in Brussels but it gave us time to taste some Belgian beer and waffles. We spent a good bit of time wandering around the city in search of the peeing boy, (Yes, that’s right., a peeing boy is a major tourist attraction, go figure!), the Palace and Central Square.

France

Sadly, our only stop in France was Paris. I must say how much Paris had changed in ten years. I had only had a layover in Paris on my way to the Cannes Film Festival the last time I was in France. I was lied to by someone who worked for the airline I was taking and thank goodness I knew enough French to understand and… ahem.. correct the problem. France has changed so much, I was shocked at how kind, helpful and interactive everyone was. We had four days in total to spend here, two days at the start of our trip and two days near the end of our 6 week trek. We explored the city during the day with the help of an excellent guide, Emmanuelle, whom we met at dinner our first night there. Our second trip on the return leg we reunited with our new friend, Emmanuelle, visited the Lourve, went to a birthday party and saw an old friend from C.A., Greg Corinth, who was in Paris visiting relatives.

Italy

We arrived at our first stop, Florence, by high speed train from Paris. We explored only in the evenings as the heat was pretty incredible during the day. After staying five days, we then headed down to Rome for an afternoon while we waited for our flight to the island of Sicily. We were met by our good friend, Giovanella at the airport and the adventure began immediately. If you have ever driven or ridden in a car in Italy, you know what I mean. Although we spent most of the week white knuckled, driving in the car, a week spent in Sicily was just not enough. Amazing doesn’t even come close to describing it’s treasure chest of spots. There simply weren’t enough hours in the day to stop and pour over relics, take photos of architecture and art in all of the places we wanted to do so. We toured through some absolutely beautiful places like: Taormina, Caltagirone, Agrigento and Syracuse. Our friend, Giovanella and her family, gave us the grand tour and treated us to the best of everything. It made me fall even deeper in love with Italy and it’s people. We then flew back to Rome to explore the eternal city. The fountains, buildings, ruins and piazzas must be seen and experienced by everyone. The beauty of this country is truly a global treasure which must be preserved.

Vatican City

Although this country / city is located within Rome it has a much different feel then the rest of Rome. The piazza, museum, cathedral and fountains are definitely worth the couple days we devoted to it. While in Rome, we stayed just outside the walls of the Vatican and passed through St. Peter’s Square everyday.

Spain

From Rome we flew to Madrid. Our time in Spain was divided between Madrid, Barcelona and Cardona. We didn’t exactly have a plan, but it worked out perfectly. We couldn’t have done a better job had we gone to all of the toil and trouble of planning it months in advance. Our first full night in Madrid we saw the Real Madrid football game, (Be sure to bring a gas mask because the plumes of cigarette smoke can ruin a great night and the next few days, if you have allergies). Then, a few days later, we met up with Margaux, an old friend of mine who just so happens to be one of the few well published, American wine and food critics in Spain and she gave us two days of city tours and introduced us to many local people and cuisine styles too. Having spent a few days in amazing Madrid we were off to Barcelona, which is a beautiful city with a plethora of amazing architectural feats designed by Gaudi. We didn’t have a lot of time in the city as we were on a mission to visit the countryside and Andorra. The only time we rented a car on this trip was to travel between Barcelona and Andorra. Magical Spain allowed us to fulfill another lifelong dream. Both of us had always wanted to stay in a medieval castle. The parador, (castle in Spanish), we stayed in can be found in historical Cardona.

Andorra

It is a beautiful mountain country, very small and wedged between France and Spain. It is pretty much only accessible by road so we drove in from Barcelona. The drive was a mere few hours, but it was some of the prettiest scenery on our trip. The mountains were calling to us the entire way. Mist covered some and others stood proudly into the clouds above. Our main goal in Andorra was to visit the amazing Caldea spa for my birthday, detox my throat, sinuses and lungs from the smokers and auto exhaust while relaxing, away from the busy cities where we had been spending a good portion of our time. We stayed in our timeshare, a chalet, which we had reserved many months prior. It was the off season so the restaurants, stores and streets were quite empty. It was a nice change. We enjoyed a few days exploring, tasting the local fare and driving around before we headed back to Spain, eager to stay in our first castle.

Up, Up and Away with Quique Dacosta

Quique Dacosta has been one of the skyrocketing new generation leaders of traditional Spanish vanguard signature cuisine in the past few years and at the age of 37, he has been experimenting and researching for example, the uses of aloe vera plants in their embryonic stage. He didn’t know if aloe vera was even edible at that point during it’s development when he began his trials.  However, he had known of it’s emulsifying properties. He told me, it was simply a process of trial and error until he managed to create the delectably edible. His investigative spirit has earned him global recognition, a host of awards and two well earned Michelin stars.

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He totally understands that Spain’s current status is not due to chance. He is part of the 4th generation of Spanish chefs who embrace and expound gratitude for those who came before them. Being at the very pinnacle of the vanguard epicurean movement, he continues breaking free, without boundaries, and his design aesthetics are all a part of Dacosta’s impeccably flawless creations, including his re-engineering and transformation of the live sensations and aromas of surf and turf, utilizing the most cutting edge, marvelous products on the market to do so.

Face to Face at El Poblet

  • Mar: Firstly, how would you describe your cuisine?
  • Quique: Vanguard Spanish cooking.
  • Mar: The economic crisis and El Poblet?
  • Quique: I believe it is somewhat complicated for my team, my clients and I was born during a recessive economy so I have had to be more prudent. Nevertheless, we shall overcome this.
  • Mar: Define your palate.
  • Quique: I do not have a favourite dish or preferred flavour. I like just about all.
  • Mar: Can you tell us about your star ingredients?
  • Quique: To name a few: marine algaes, sea lettuces, almonds, Valencian oranges, embryonic vegetables, tuna belly, sea urchins, Dénia red prawns and the Diabetic Green Sugar plant.
  • Mar: What motivated your culinary career?
  • Quique: By accident actually. I arrived in Dénia from Jarandilla de La Vera to spend a summer vacation when I was 14. I was terribly bored and didn’t know anybody. I decided to get a part time job at the local pizzeria. This had been my first contact with a restaurant. It was not exactly a culinary position, however, it sparked the flames of culinary interest.
  • Mar: Tell us about your latest bill of fare.
  • Quique: The idea was initially very clear and quintessential. I have reconstructed Montgó Nature Reserve and the shore, that is to transform the live sensations and the aromas utilising marvelous culinary products and state of the art kitchen equipment.

The Latest Taster’s Carte

  • Snack, crackle & crisp toast snacks: Reggiano Parmesano, Black olive, Walnut, Greek Phyllo and Dried Fruits
  • Trufa blanca de Montgó: White truffles filled with parmesano, fresh goat cheese & blended with white truffles and sprinkled with 5 wild mushroom dust
  • La Bruma: Steamed snow peas, baby lima beans, embryonic stage sweet peas, aromatic herbs, pinenuts and sprouts in a garden steamed
  • Moshi: Cockles, langoustines and pansies in broth.
  • Impresionismo La Roca: Fresh oysters and baby squid in gel
  • Expresionismo rojo: Inspired by painter Mark Rotho, red mullet with saffron
  • Dessert 1: Budding cherries with crumbs of pastry
  • Dessert 2: Green melon, cantaloupe, dried fruits and mandarin smear

Additionally, there were 5 white wines that paired perfectly. “Our point of view? It was a magical experience in every aspect.”


CHEF QUIQUE DACOSTA
Restaurant El Poblet

Centre Les Marines
Km 2.5
Dénia, Alicante
Reservations: 96. 557. 4179
Website:Restaurant El Poblet
 

Email: Restaurant and Reservations

Riding The Crest of the Waves with Chef & Author Angel Leon

Tartar de Gamba Blanca con Plancton - Chef Angel Leon
Riding the crest of the waves with a totally evolutionary vanguard cuisine offering an experience he entitles calm gastronomy is one of a kind Chef Ángel León.

The Sea Against The Current

Chef & Author Ángel León

At his Puerto de Santa Maria restaurant Aponiente, Ángel has conjured up an epicurism with the enchantment of the world under the sea. He has proven himself a master investigator of Plankton, marine lettuces and algaes, which he filters in his own concoctions and gastronomic gadgets. Additionally, he is an expert in fish, shellfish and seafoods and their preparations. Furthermore, he has invented CLARIMAX for clarifying liquid ingredients to create transparent consommés and utilises olive pits in place of carbon for braising, grilling and barbecuing on open flame.

His pure Andalucian hedonism has brought him many awards at Madrid Fusion and on Canal Cocina T.V. His father, a medical doctor and researcher coupled with his medical doctor mother have instilled in him the investigative nature. His ultimate research project at the University of Cádiz derived in the development of the state of the art CLARIMAX, a kitchen machine constructed by JP SELECTA in Barcelona. Whether coaching, cooking or fishing, Ángel is detail oriented and a perfectionist. His inspiration, inventiveness and “the product” culinary philosophy has enabled him to dazzle diners with his dramatically provocative presentations at your table. His extraordinaire vanguard culinary methodology, unique ingredients an enrapturing touches from his home land all provide the most incredible dining experience one can ever have.

This is an adventure in which you shall savour the mysteries of taste, aroma and textures inspired by the evocative food notes in Ángel´s 22 seat unique magical Soho Manhattan style little restaurant. Furthermore, he has catalogued 100.000 marine species and has constituted algaes, marine flora and marine fauna as the most quintessential of his extensive work with phyto-plankton and the ideal means of culinary diathermy for heating.

CHEEK TO CHEEK WITH ÁNGEL

  • Mar: Your culinary philosophy ?
  • Ángel: The product and no chemicals. I specialize in the natural.
  • Mar: Who are your mentors ?
  • Ángel: Chef Joel Robuchon of 3 Michelin star Restaurant L´Atelier where I worked in France for seven years and for three years in Toledo at La Casa de Templo where I was learning about the historic roots of Spanish culture including the Arabic Moorish and the Sefardic.
  • Mar: The sea ?
  • Ángel: I have always had an obsession with the sea and I enjoy fishing with my dad, cleaning, cutting and preparing fish.
  • Mar: What does Plankton taste like ?
  • Ángel: Here is a sample. The palate tours many new territories of taste while submerging your senses in an astonishing awakening. Plankton contains the highest measurement of Omega 3 thus, this is for health. How would you describe the taste of Plankton ?
  • Mar: It tastes sort of like a fusion between creamed spinach with a slightly oily finish similar to extra virgin olive oil or wild salmon – must be the Omega 3 consistency along with tasting notes of fresh marine herbs, algaes and sea salt perfectly merged together. I like it.
  • Mar: Thank-you. Do you fish for Aponiente ?
  • Ángel: Yes I do, however I am also very community minded and I coach crews on ships and small fishing vessels who are working for 15 Euros hourly. I have taken 30 day fishing excursions bringing in 50 tons of fresh fish. I have also wanted to mention, that I have sourced fish in Cádiz for 4 Euros a kilo and in Madrid these species sell for 40 Euros a kilo.
  • Mar: I believe you would do quite well in politics! What exactly are you doing with plankton ?
  • Ángel: Plankton groves. I filter 1 gram in 17.000 litres of water. The Omega 3 content is the most numerous of all edible species and / or plant life. Plankton is the cellular origin of all.
  • Mar: I understand that you have invented some gourmet gadgets and kitchen machinery ?
  • Ángel: Firstly, CLARIMAX which clarifies a large variety of liquids and soups. I have also created a micro algae diathermy which is a robot capable of making liquids transparent in color. Through extensive research and investigation, I have found that olive pits can be used instead of toxic carbon for grilling, barbecuing and braising of fish, vegetables and meats and the olive pits impart their golden nectar on the exteriors of the products one is grilling.
  • Mar: Do you have any research investigation projects scheduled for 2010 ?
  • Ángel: I am in the process of a joint venture, in which we are collaborating on a baby foodline with a Japanese manufacturer.
  • Mar: And your dream trip ?
  • Ángel: To lose myself in the Alaskan Arctic on a boat.
  • Mar: The crisis ?
  • Ángel: Complicated, hard. I have 22 seats and 11 employee team staff members. Crazy !
  • Mar: Science and ideas ?
  • Ángel: My parents are doctors and medical researchers so I have always respected science, the sea and the culinary arts. Day to day, ideas come to me.
  • Mar: Have you thought to author a book ?
  • Ángel: In March 2010, my trilingual book shall be launched in the market in: Madrid Capital, Washington D.C. & Paris, France. The title: MAR CONTRA CORRIENTE which signifies THE SEA AGAINST THE CURRENT. This is not a run of the mill cookbook. This is a book that comes from passion and fully lives up to the challenges of the title.
  • Mar: I look forward to seeing you in Madrid in March and reading your first book. Tell us, what was your first elaborated recipe at home ?
  • Ángel: Well, my 1st recipe prepared at home was a caramel custard dessert. My mother was livid with me for the tremendous mess I made in the kitchen. I was sort of a Dennis the Menace!
  • Mar: Do you cook at home ?
  • Ángel: Never. I enjoy my mortadella hero sandwich and an ice cold coca cola.
  • Mar: Last but not least, music in the kitchen while working ?
  • Ángel: Instrumental jazz & instrumental flamenco can work. I am also a believer that ”in the stillness of silence is the power.”

ONE OF A KIND MARINE ELIXIRS

An array of perfectly pairing wines by the glass to accompany each dish

  • Salmuera Gaditana: a marine based antipasto palete opener
  • Magnificant Marine Plankton foam, fresh clams, mussel s & Moroccan lemon
  • Freshly caught marvelous mackerel sashimi marinated in sea salt
  • Exotic & delicious Marinated gilt bream and wasabi saffron infusion
  • Phenomenal grilled sardines on olive pits with spearmint confit
  • Perfectly prepared Lula Portuguese squid puntilla calamar ravioli filled with squid stew interior

Incredibly white fleshed silky textured whole fish Borriquete or Burro fish and in English: Rubber Lip Grunt fish, served with mint tea consommé. Ángel explained that he was going to filet the fish for Pilar and I at the table because the stomach of this fish is unedible.

The outstanding Dessert Wines:

  • San Domingo Jerez Pale Cream a Chocolate perfume with sour orange concoction
  • Dandelion flower & Granny Apple Burst ! (And it does burst!)

Restauarante Aponiente

Puerto Escondido 6
Calle Ribera de Marisco
El Puerto de Santa Maria, Cádiz 11500

Book : 956. 851. 870

Website : Aponiente Restaurante in Cadiz

Edited By Janet Song